April 24, 2021

Influential

Barron’s 100 Most Influential Women in U.S. Finance: Jennifer Piepszak

Jenn Piepszak


Courtesy JPMorgan Chase

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Jennifer Piepszak has been chief financial officer of

JPMorgan

Chase, the largest U.S. bank, since May 2019. She spent 26 years before that in other leadership roles, in areas including business banking, mortgages, and credit card operations.

Outside the bank, the CFO is on the board of United Way of New York. This is her second year on the Barron’s list.

Last year was particularly challenging, as “everything that could happen to a bank happened,” she tells Barron’s.

100 Most Influential Women in U.S. Finance

Like other financial companies,


JPMorgan set aside

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Barron’s 100 Most Influential Women in U.S. Finance: Carmen Reinhart

Carmen Reinhart

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Carmen Reinhart arrived in the U.S. at the age of 10, with her family and three suitcases. They were refugees from Cuba. At the local college, she initially took courses on fashion merchandising. “I really hated it,” she says.

Then she discovered economics. “That was that,” recalls the chief economist of the World Bank. By her second year of college, she was so enamored that she pledged to attend graduate school.

At Columbia, she grew fascinated by financial crises and contagion. By the time she joined Bear Stearns in 1982, she was well prepared to analyze

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Barron’s 100 Most Influential Women in U.S. Finance: Anna Marrs

Anna Marrs


Courtesy of American Express

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With a career spanning several distinct firms, industries, and continents,

American Express

’ Anna Marrs has seen it all.

“Learning and a sense of adventure are the two common themes throughout my jobs,” Marrs says. “I’ve always been attracted to roles and people I can learn a lot from. Your career is a huge part of your life, so I have always tried to make it challenging and fun.”

As the New York–based president of global commercial services, Marrs oversees AmEx’s products for corporate customers, ranging from small businesses to multinational corporations.

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Barron’s 100 Most Influential Women in U.S. Finance: Sandra Horbach

Sandra Horbach

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The Carlyle Group’s

Sandra Horbach has forged one of the most impressive careers in private equity, having led some of the more exciting deals over the last decade, including Beats Electronics, Dunkin’ Brands, and The Nature’s Bounty Co.

Horbach, 60, currently is a managing director and co-head of U.S. buyouts at Carlyle, where she launched the Consumer & Retail Group and oversees three of the firm’s largest private equity funds, with roughly $40 billion in assets under management.

100 Most Influential Women in U.S. Finance

Prior to joining Carlyle in 2005, she spent 18 years

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Barron’s 100 Most Influential Women in U.S. Finance: Seema Hingorani

Seema Hingorani

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When Seema Hingorani was chief investment officer of New York City’s Retirement Systems, she spotted a problem: little diversity among the asset managers vying to invest the city’s roughly $160 billion in assets, with many complaining they couldn’t find any women or people of color.

Hingorani, a daughter of Indian immigrants who started her asset-management career as an analyst at T. Rowe Price and eventually became a hedge fund manager, decided to fix the so-called “pipeline” problem by founding the nonprofit Girls Who Invest in 2015.

100 Most Influential Women in U.S. Finance

More than 500

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Barron’s 100 Most Influential Women in U.S. Finance: Amy Hood

Amy Hood

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Microsoft’s

finance chief, Amy Hood, didn’t let the Covid-19 pandemic slow the company’s appetite for growth. She played an instrumental role in the company’s eight acquisitions last year.

Microsoft generated more than $50 billion in commercial cloud revenue in its latest full year, a milestone that accentuate’s Microsoft’s transformation from its Windows-centric software business.

The company’s 2020 acquisitions included videogame publisher ZeniMax Media, for $7.5 billion. For the first time, Microsoft’s videogame revenue exceeded $5 billion in the company’s fiscal second quarter, helped by the launch of its latest generation of Xbox systems.

100 Most

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