May 4, 2021

politics

9 Ways to Fail Miserably at Office Politics

“Office politics,” says Boston-based Karen Dillon, “is impossible to avoid. But it is manageable if you know what not to do. As the former editor of the Harvard Business Review magazine and author of the HBR Guide to Office Politics, Dillon provides a wealth of accessible, highly useful approaches to prevent being steamrolled by nasty behavior in the workplace.

I asked her, “What are some of the worst things I could do when faced with craziness on the job from my boss or co-workers?”

1. Take everything personally when someone talks over you or criticizes your ideas. Fume!

Consequences

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WATCH NOW: ‘Is this right?’ New federal law drives down health insurance costs in marketplace | Govt. and Politics

Last week, Torres-Barrera called “out of the blue” and suggested that LeBlanc resubmit her application to the marketplace. The result? Her monthly premium fell from $339 to $209 a month, a monthly savings of $120.

“I feel for people who don’t have support,” she said.

The Kaiser Family Foundation estimates that the new law will expand health coverage to 3.7 million uninsured Americans, an increase of 20%. The estimated average savings range from $33 a month for someone who earns less than 150% of the poverty level ($19,320 for an individual), to $213 a month for someone with an income

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With Georgia Voting Law, the Business of Business Becomes Politics

Big consumer brands like Coca-Cola Co. and Delta Air Lines Inc. for years have positioned themselves as forces for promoting what they see as social good—an approach they displayed last summer after the death of George Floyd.

Coca-Cola turned off its Times Square billboard for a day. Delta flew Mr. Floyd’s body to his family in Houston. The Atlanta-based companies were among the scores of big corporations around the country that pledged an array of money and initiatives toward racial justice amid the upheaval that Mr. Floyd’s death while in police custody unleashed.

Now, business leaders are facing new pressures

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Business faces tricky path navigating post-Trump politics

WASHINGTON (AP) — For more than a half-century, the voice emerging from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s monolithic, Beaux Arts-styled building near the White House was predictable: It was the embodiment of American business and, more specifically, a shared set of interests with the Republican Party.

The party’s bond with corporate America, however, is fraying.

Fissures have burst open over the GOP’s embrace of conspiracy theories and rejection of mainstream climate science, as well as its dismissal of the 2020 election outcome. The most recent flashpoint was in Georgia, where a new Republican-backed law restricting voting rights drew harsh criticism

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McConnell backs away from warning businesses to stay out of politics

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellRomney blasts end of filibuster, expansion of SCOTUS McConnell, GOP slam Biden’s executive order on SCOTUS Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists MORE (R-Ky.) on Wednesday backed off his stern warning that companies such as Major League Baseball, Delta and Coca-Cola should stay out of high-profile political fights after they criticized Georgia’s new election law.

“I didn’t say that very artfully yesterday. They’re certainly entitled to be involved in politics. They are. My principal complaint

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Cuomo, Democrats, and the politics of personal conduct

The politics of personal conduct has burst forth again. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is facing calls for resignation over alleged sexual harassment of women. The scandal has been compounded by another embroiling Governor Cuomo – allegations that his administration purposely withheld data on COVID-19 deaths in New York nursing homes. 

Yet some three years after the #MeToo movement swept the nation, bringing new scrutiny and standards to workplace behavior and power imbalances, the reports of Mr. Cuomo’s sexually charged language with young women are raising knotty political and ethical questions for Democrats. Some see a moral imperative to draw

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