March 27, 2021

water

KSL Investigates: What water damage is not covered by homeowners insurance?

SALT LAKE CITY – When it comes to homeowners’ insurance, there are certain things you can just count on being covered.

Damage from fire and wind is going to be covered, but damage from water is … a bit more complicated.

Michelle Megna with Insurance.com said thousands of homeowners every year are shocked when the inside of their home ends up wet — and insurance leaves them high and dry.

“Water damage claims are among the most common claims that homeowners make,” she said.

One rule of thumb, she said, is to try and answer the question: Where did the

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7 quick tips to save money on your gas, electric and water bills right now


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The average family spends about $126.65 per month on their electric bill. That adds up to more than $1,500 per year. And when money is tight, reducing your electricity bill is one of the quickest ways to save each month. But if you’re like many people, you’re not sure how to do that. After all, we all have to use electricity, right? We’ve rounded up a few of the best free ways to reduce energy consumption and save money on your electric bill right now (as well as a couple of bonus tips to save on gas and

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Does homeowners insurance cover water damage?

Personal Finance Insider writes about products, strategies, and tips to help you make smart decisions with your money. We may receive a small commission from our partners, like American Express, but our reporting and recommendations are always independent and objective.

Homeowners insurance protects your home from damage, theft, and liability. But there are limitations to that coverage — and it depends on the type of “peril” your policy insures against.

There are eight types of homeowners insurance, but they all fall into one of two categories: named peril or open (all) peril. A named peril policy covers you for listed

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Do you really need insurance for your water and sewer lines? Here’s what to know.

These notices often convince homeowners that there are hidden defects on their properties that need to be addressed. Why else would their utility companies issue such dramatic warnings?

Although these mailings seem to come from utility companies, they’re really pitches from third-party companies that have struck partnership agreements with utility providers, allowing them use of their names and logos to sell their warranty plans.

More than 7 million U.S. homeowners have so far purchased these plans, pulling in $900 million a year, according to information disclosed in annual reports from the largest warranty companies.

In the Washington area, Dominion Energy,

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